(197LEcur) Lepidocyrtus curvicollis Bourlet, 1839

Lepidocyrtus curvicollis is a predominantly pale species with traces of pigment on the head, thorax and legs (Figs. 1, 2, 3). It reaches a maximum length of 3.0 mm. In the field (and in photographs), Lepidocyrtus curvicollis may appear darker than when immersed in 70% alcohol. The main field character second thoracic segment overhangs the head dorsally (Fig. 4). Scales are present on the legs, and on the antennae (Fig. 5). A character shared only with the darkly pigmented Lepidocyrtus paradoxus (which probably does not occur in the UK) is the presence of scales on ant3 (Fig. 5) and ant4 in addition to ant1 and ant2, although those on antennal segment 4 (at the tip) are very difficult to resolve.
Lepidocyrtus curvicollis is probably present in the majority of hectads in the UK and Ireland, but despite its very distinctive appearance is only appearing in small numbers on photo-sharing web sites, such as here.

 

 

 

Map for Lepidocyrtus curvicollis (197 LEcur), last updated 14 Dec 2012

 

Fig. 1: Lepidocyrtus curvicollis (2.5 mm in length) from a compost heap in a garden in Reading.

Fig. 2: Lepidocyrtus curvicollis (2.5 mm in length) from a compost heap in a garden in Reading.

Fig. 3: Lepidocyrtus curvicollis (2.5 mm in length) from a compost heap in a garden in Reading. Note that shiny scales are present on the antennae and legs.

Fig. 4: Lepidocyrtus curvicollis (2.8 mm in length) collected from Notting Hill, London in April 1963 by R. Adams. Note that the second thoracic segment (arrow) projects over the head.

Fig. 5: Lepidocyrtus curvicollis (2.8 mm in length) collected from Ballalena, Co. Down, Ireland in July 1939 by Bagnall. Note that scales (s) are present on antennal segments 1, 2 and 3.

 
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