(206PSalb) Pseudosinella alba (Packard, 1873)

Pseudosinella alba is widespread and very common in leaf litter, soil and organic matter throughout Britain and Ireland. Each eye is comprised of two ocelli which are close together in a single spot of pigment on either side of the head (Fig. 1). However, the ocelli are difficult to resolve unless the pigment has been cleared. The claw has prominent teeth (Fig. 2). The body is covered in scales (Fig. 3). Scales are also present on the dens and the mucro has two teeth (Fig. 4). Specimens labelled 'Pseudosinella alba' from at least twenty further localities in the NHML collection are in too poor a condition to identify reliably.

 

 

 

 

Fig. 1: Pair of ocelli on the left side of the head of Pseudosinella alba collected from Bantry, Co. Cork, Ireland in January 1953 (collector not known).

Fig. 2: Foot of the third leg of Pseudosinella alba collected from Gaping Ghyll Cavern in August 1968 by W.G.R. Maxwell. tt, tibiotarsus.

Fig. 3: Scales on the abdomen of the same specimen of Pseudosinella alba shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 4: Dens and mucro of the furca of the same specimen of Pseudosinella alba shown in Fig. 1.

 
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