(353TOvul) Tomocerus vulgaris (Tullberg, 1871)

Tomocerus vulgaris (as its specific name would suggest) is a common and widespread species (although it is not the most common Tomocerus in Britain and Ireland and has only been recorded once  from the SW). The spines on the inner side of the dens are simple and there are no large leaf-shaped scales close to the point where the dentes join the manubrium (Fig. 1 and 2). The empodial appendage of the foot is just over half as long as the claw (Fig. 3). The mucro is long and generally distinctive, with 4-9 medial teeth (Fig. 4).

 

However there have been a few records in the South-east of England of a Tomocerus that resembles Tomocerus vulgaris except that the mucro has only 1-2 medial teeth.  These key to Tomocerina minuta (but certainly are not), or using Gisin (1960) they key to the spanish endemic Tomocerus catalanus.  Their COI barcode was 94.3% identical to Tomocerus vulgaris, so these are probably just an unusual Tomocerus vulgaris.  This odd form of Tomocerus vulgaris also had a red "upper lip" (fig. 6), and should be watched out for.

 

 

 

Map of Tomocerus vulgaris, updated Feb 2013.

Fig. 1: Basal region of the dentes of Tomocerus vulgaris collected from Holme Fen, Hunts. in September 1963 by Peter Lawrence illuminated by phase contrast. There are no large leaf-shaped scales close to the point where the dentes join the manubrium (*)

Fig. 2: Same view as in Fig. 1 but under ordinary illumination.

Fig. 3: Foot of the third leg of the same specimen of Tomocerus vulgaris shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 4: Mucro of the same specimen of Tomocerus vulgaris shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 5: Mucro of unusual Tomocerus vulgaris from Whitelands College 9 Dec 2012. This lack of medial teeth should take it to minutus or catalanus, but DNA work confirms this to be close (94.3%) to Tomocerus vulgaris.

Fig. 6: red labral zone of the Tomocerus vulgaris in Fig. 5

 
Facebook icon    Twitter icon    Instagram icon    LinkedIn icon © Roehampton University