(411 DSpat) Disparrhopalites patrizi (Cassagnau & Delamare Deboutteville, 1953)

Disparrhopalites patriziin only known from 3 UK caves, 2 in Devon and one in south Wales. It was discovered in Rock House Caves, Devon in June 1971 by W. Maxwell. The species is white and reaches a length of 1.0 mm. Although generally considered to be a troglobite (i.e. 'cave life'), Disparrhopalites patrizi has been recorded from sites away from caves in mainland Europe.
The fourth antennal segment (ant4) is divided into 12 subsegments (Fig. 1). Both edges of the mucro are serrated (Figs. 2, 3). The female sub-anal appendages (SAA) are not expanded at the tip (Fig. 4). The empodium of the foot is about four fifths the length of the claw (Fig. 5) which bears numerous tiny teeth on its inner edge (Fig. 6).
Disparrhopalites patrizi should certainly be looked for in caves in the south of England where it has probably been overlooked.  

There are 3 other troglobites in the UK; Folsomia agrelli, Oligaphorura schoetti and Pseudosinella dobati.

 

 

 

 

Fig. 1: Distal part of the antenna of Disparrhopalites patrizi collected from Rock House Caves, South Devon in June 1971 by W. Maxwell. The fourth antennal segment (ant4) is divided into 12 subsegments.

 

 

Fig. 2 and 3: Mucro of the same specimen of Disparrhopalites patrizi shown in Fig. 1 at two levels of focus.

 

 

Fig. 3.

 

 

Fig. 4: Female Sub Anal Appendage (SAA) of the same specimen of Disparrhopalites patrizi shown in Fig. 1.

 

 

Fig. 5 and 6: Foot of the third leg of the same specimen of Disparrhopalites patrizi shown in Fig. 1 at two levels of focus.

 

 

Fig. 6.


 
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