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Programme Details 2016-2017

Doctor of Practical Theology


DTh
Department of Humanities

PROGRAMME CONVENER(S): Dr John Moxon, 020 8392 3350, john.moxon@roehampton.ac.uk

For further information, please contact the Department Administrator, Theresina Chidzero, 020 8392 3279, theresina.chidzero@roehampton.ac.uk.

GENERAL CREDIT AND LEVEL RATING:
DTh: 120 credits at Level 7 and 420 credits at Doctoral Level (540 credits in total)

LOCATION: Roehampton Lane campus (Digby Stuart College).

PROGRAMME OUTLINE: The DTh is a ministry–focussed variant of the professional doctorate now common in the UK in educational, clinical and now church and theological–related professions.

AIMS: The programme aims to provide a strategic professional doctoral programme for senior level ministry personnel from a wide range of Church backgrounds. It will complement provision in this subject area at BTh and MA levels and both capitalise on and strengthen the research base of the department.

As a professional doctorate, the programme is aimed at equipping those with existing experience as practitioners to fulfil more senior level, national or international roles as leaders, advisors or consultants in ministry–related fields. The programme seeks to foster dialogue between the varied and often pioneering work of individuals and the strategic thinking of current or prospective employers within the sector.

The Doctor of Theology programme (DTh) aims to:

  • enhance and develop the critical analytical, evaluative, reflective and research skills of those already engaged in Christian Ministry in order to further the professional formation and impact of practitioners via theological and technical reflection on ministry praxis, and the application of scholarship to a range of ministry contexts;
  • provide an extensive knowledge and critical understanding of selected areas of Practical Theology and the critical methods practiced at the forefront of the discipline in order to be able to produce findings that satisfy peer scrutiny and are deemed to be of publishable quality, making an original contribution to knowledge;
  • develop the ability to handle written sources and empirical data using appropriate advanced critical methods and controls, to marshal coherent and effective arguments and communicate conclusions in oral and written form, and to apply these skills in the production of an extended study at the forefront of the discipline;
  • enable the student to demonstrate a competent grasp of a range of technical skills arising within the subject and cognate disciplines, including a range of approaches to textual historical, hermeneutical and cultural issues, and both quantitative and qualitative approaches to the investigation of individual and social experience and behaviour; and to respond critically to their use by others.

LEARNING OUTCOMES: By the end of Stage 1A of the programme, students will be expected to have:

Knowledge and Understanding

  • a critical, integrated and applicable knowledge of the core discourses of Christian mission and ministry developed in dialogue with disciplines such as biblical interpretation, historical and contemporary theology, sociology and psychology of religion, missiology, pastoral and practical theology, creative arts, cross–cultural and leadership studies, community and international development;
  • a broad grasp of the critical stances, creative and reflective engagements and empirical methods typically used in applied theological research within a variety of church, cultural, social and organisational contexts.
Academic Skills
  • the ability to select, interpret and analyse scholarly sources such as peer-reviewed articles and monographs, and engage with them critically and creatively in a problem–focused manner;
  • the ability to address significant questions in the field, critically negotiating their own and others' stances with fairness and integrity, locating them within or between classical outlooks or positions, and by appropriate analysis, synthesis and theological argument, offer meaningful responses and justified conclusions.
Professional and Practical Skills
  • the ability to make advanced use of library and IT skills to identify and locate sources, capture, analyse and present data, represent and manipulate knowledge, organise and backup work and operate responsibly online;
  • the ability to communicate ideas and their possible practical applications effectively to academic peers via well–structured academic writing and/or creative presentations with verbal and multi–media elements.
By the end of Stage 1B of the programme, students will be expected to have:

Knowledge and Understanding
  • a comprehensive understanding of the aims, disciplines, creative and reflective processes, critical and hermeneutical approaches and empirical methodologies used at the forefront of the discipline;
  • a detailed grasp of some of the challenges facing major organisations today and associated applications of Practical Theology to problems of meaning, praxis or policy, backed by a comprehensive survey of the published research within an area of special interest.
Academic Skills
  • the ability to identify, locate, interpret and analyse primary texts and advanced secondary sources with confidence at a research level, including articles from major peer-reviewed journals and scholarly monographs, and engage with them critically and creatively;
  • the ability to select use a stated critical approach and/or empirical methodology from the forefront of the discipline within the development of a publishable article, to draw meaningful conclusions of potential significance, suggest future research questions and outline possible larger–scale projects.
Professional and Practical Skills
  • the ability to conduct research in practical theology, using appropriate primary and secondary sources and/or data collection and analysis techniques, and an appropriate range of IT and other tools, articulating and locating any conclusions and potential significance within current scholarly discourse;
  • the ability to communicate research effectively via well–structured, evidence–driven academic writing, verbal and multi–media presentations emphasising key findings and potential impact with academic peers.
By the end of Stage 1B of the programme (with an option for MTh exit award), students will be expected to have:

Knowledge and Understanding
  • a comprehensive understanding of the aims, disciplines, creative and reflective processes, critical and hermeneutical approaches and empirical methodologies used at the forefront of the discipline;
  • a detailed grasp of some of the challenges facing major organisations today and associated applications of Practical Theology to problems of meaning, praxis or policy;
  • a developed critical understanding of a problem or creative challenge within practical theology of current professional interest, backed by a survey of published work and the execution of an extended research project.
Academic Skills
  • the ability to identify, locate, interpret and analyse primary texts and advanced secondary sources with confidence at a research level, including articles from major peer-reviewed journals and scholarly monographs, and engage with them critically and creatively;
  • the ability to select use a critical, creative or reflective approach and/or empirical methodology from the forefront of the discipline and to draw meaningful conclusions of potential significance, and suggest avenues for future research;
  • the ability to situate their research within current academic discourse and construct a sustained critical argument over a 15,000-word dissertation (or equivalent for creative projects, including artefacts plus critical commentary) that articulates their contribution to knowledge or understanding.
Professional and Practical Skills
  • the ability to address a problem within practical theology of current professional interest via the design and execution of an extended project, using appropriate primary and secondary sources and/or data collection and analysis techniques, IT and other tools;
  • the ability to conduct soundly–designed and well–planned research in Practical Theology, in compliance with all relevant ethics and safeguarding policies where relevant, using IT–based and other tools for the collection, representation, storage, manipulation and analysis of analysis of texts, artefacts, images, data and knowledge (as appropriate), and articulate degrees of confidence or coherence in any findings;
  • the ability to communicate research effectively via well–structured, evidence–driven academic writing, verbal and multi–media presentations emphasising key achievements, findings and potential impact with academic peers.
By the end of the programme (Stage 2), students will be expected to have:

Knowledge and Understanding
  • a comprehensive understanding of the aims, disciplines, creative and reflective processes, critical and hermeneutical approaches and empirical methodologies used at the forefront of the discipline;
  • a detailed grasp of the challenges facing major organisations today and a range of significant current applications of Practical Theology to problems of meaning, praxis or policy within the sector and associated questions of interpretation and application;
  • an advanced critical and innovative insight into a particular problem or creative challenge within practical theology gained via a specifically–designed research project on a question of current professional interest, leading to a significant and original contribution to knowledge or understanding.
Academic Skills
  • the ability to identify, locate, interpret and analyse primary texts and advanced secondary sources with confidence at a research level, including articles from major peer-reviewed journals and scholarly monographs, and engage with them critically and creatively;
  • the ability to select, adapt or significantly modify advanced critical, creative and reflective approaches and/or empirical methodologies from the forefront of the discipline and use them to come to meaningful conclusions about carefully designed research questions or creative goals, articulating their significance in relation to current theory or praxis and suggesting avenues for future research;
  • the ability to situate the student’s research within the wider but potentially incomplete knowledge informing current academic discourse, and construct a sustained argument over a 50,000–60,000 word dissertation (or equivalent for creative projects, including artefacts plus critical commentary) that articulates a significant and original contribution to knowledge or understanding with significance for professional practice.
Professional and Practical Skills
  • the ability to address a significant current question, creative or reflective challenge and/or strategic problem within professional praxis via the design of a substantial and potentially high–impact inquiry, creative or reflective project, executed using professional project–management skills with appropriate account of resources, budgets, time–frames and format, including the production of a monograph–length report;
  • the ability to conduct soundly–designed and well–planned research in Practical Theology, in compliance with all relevant ethics and safeguarding policies where relevant, using IT–based and other tools for the collection, representation, storage, manipulation and analysis of texts, artefacts, images, data and knowledge (as appropriate), and articulate degrees of confidence or coherence in any findings;
  • the ability to communicate research effectively via well–structured, evidence driven academic writing, creative visualisation and communication of findings in verbal, multi–media and/or online presentations emphasising key creative achievements, findings, possible significance and potential public impact with academic peers, professional colleagues and potential funders of future research.

 

Compulsory and Required modules
Compulsory and/or required modules may change when we review and update programmes. Below is a list of modules offered this academic year.

Optional modules
Optional modules, when offered as part of a programme, may vary from year to year and are subject to viability.

LEVEL 7 & LEVEL D (DOCTORAL)

To be awarded the DTh, students must complete 540 credits, comprising: 120 at Stage 1A, 120 at Stage 1B and 300 at Stage 2.

Stage 1A
Students must complete 120 taught credits at Level 7. A variety of advanced standing options on admission (e.g. via recent masters level study or advanced professional experience with a research or strategic dimension) may allow exemption from elements of this stage.
¬* TRS020L407 - Empirical Research for Christian Ministry
TRS020L423S - Approaches to Biblical Studies
TRS020L426S - Pentecostal Theology and Practice
¬TRS020L427 - Christian Ethics, Economics and the Environment
¬TRS020L430 - Missiology
TRS020L433A - Christian Ministry in Church and Society
¬TRS020L434 - Christian Doctrine Today
¬TRS020L435 - Christian Spirituality and Ministry Practice
TRS020L436A - Marriage and Family in Christian Theology and Practice
TRS020L437S - Public Theology and Community Engagement

* Students required to complete all or part of Stage 1A (i.e. without full advanced standing) must normally take TRS020L407A (Empirical Research for Christian Ministry), unless a close equivalent has been passed in the context of previous study at an approved institution.

Stage 1B
Students must complete 120 taught credits at Doctoral Level. Module DPT030D004S (Research Design (2): Methodology and Research Proposal), must normally be completed prior to starting substantive work on the Dissertation. Although Level 7 modules may be taken in any order; the Level 8 modules are taken in the sequence: DPT030D001A, DPT030D003S (1B Year 1), DPT030D002A, DPT030D004S (1B Year 2).
#DPT030D001A - Practical Theology: Advanced Methods and Approaches
#DPT030D002A - Publishable Article
#DPT030D003S - Research Design (1): Literature Review and Research Questions
#DPT030D004S - Research Design (2): Methodology and Research Proposal

Stage 2
The final stage is the completion of DPT300D005Y, the 60,000 word dissertation, which attracts 300 credits. Formal progression onto this stage is determined not only by the completion of the taught modules of Stage 1, but also by a transition approval mechanism involving a presentation and interview, based on work completed for DPT030D004S.
#DPT300D005Y - Dissertation

Exit awards

Those exiting the scheme who have completed 60 credits of taught modules from Stage 1A are eligible for the award of Postgraduate Certificate (PGC). Those completing all 120 credits of Stage 1A who decide not to proceed to Stage 1B, may exit with a Postgraduate Diploma (PGD). With this award, students may, if they wish, seek entry at the dissertation stage into the University’s MA Christian Ministry or similar.

For those who move on to Stage 1B and complete 120 credits of taught modules, but who are unable to proceed with the full Doctoral dissertation, a further 60 credit Extended Study Module, DPT060L006Y, is available, on completion of which, they may exit with the award of MTh.
DPT060L006Y - Extended Study Module

Module annotations:
# - compulsory module (must be passed)
¬ - module not available in 2016-2017.

Notes:
a) Each module code consists of a three-letter module prefix denoting the programme it belongs to (eg JOU020L403S = Journalism Studies), the following three digits refer to its credit value (eg JOU020L403S = 20 credits), the single letter in the middle (eg JOU020L403S) denotes the module level (L = Level 7), the last three digits denote its unique number (eg JOU020L403S), and the final letter denotes its suffix (eg JOU020L403S). The suffixes indicate the following: A - Autumn term, S - Spring term, H – Summer term/Summer intensive mode and Y - All year.

b) Individual module details can be viewed by clicking on each module code or using the "View all modules" link below for a complete list of module assessments and descriptions. Where an assessment has more than one component all elements must be passed, unless individual module assessment details state otherwise.


View all modules


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